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Training - Quartering
Last Post 16 Aug 2009 09:28 AM by dogpower. 10 Replies.
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zeppelinUser is Offline Pheasant Egg Pheasant Egg Send Private Message Posts:3 zeppelin
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12 Aug 2009 11:17 AM

    Hello:

     

     I am new to Dog Training and New to field hunting with a dog. My 7 month old Golden is doing fabulous in training. Now, I am in constant pursuit to training Ideas and could use some help.

      Pursuit of the day!

     Quartering! How do I begin the training to get my dog to quarter? I need him out in front of me, and thus far unable to teach him this. Looking for anyone who has input or a good source that I can read for myself.

     Thanks,

     Dan

    PorknbeansUser is Offline Master Hunter Master Hunter Send Private Message Posts:542 Porknbeans
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    12 Aug 2009 07:27 PM
    I started with a long command lead (a short pig rope with a loop on the end). The dog's competitive drive made them want to be in front of me. I used the lead to give them the idea (under close control) how I wanted them to act/behave/quarter. This is important for the dog to understand even when you turn they should turn with you. Then I went to a checkcord and extended the lesson. Granted this evolved over weeks, I'm giving you the Crib Note version. Once they had the idea I went with the e-collar with the check cord and then dropped the check cord. As a first time dog trainer, one thing I learned is that when a dog quarters they don't actually quarter every time. I know this sounds crazy to some people, but I thought that when you teach a dog to quarter they went back and forth every time. What you are actually teaching them is their boundaries and that they should work a field back and forth with their nose in that boundary. Sorry if that is obvious, it wasn't to me. I hope this helps and I know others have much better insight and information than I do.
    Porknbeans Grand High Pooba of the Fraternal Order of Procrastinators
    HillbillyUser is Offline Master Hunter Master Hunter Send Private Message Posts:706 Hillbilly
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    12 Aug 2009 09:21 PM
    No not crazy Pork totally true.
    Life's Short Play Hard
    BobUser is Offline Master Hunter Master Hunter Send Private Message Posts:550 Bob
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    12 Aug 2009 09:26 PM

    PB, I agree Tony only quarters about .50% of the time. He really likes to work in a good wide circle. He will go put to the side smelling the wind. Then he goes out away from me the cuts back across in front me then only part way back to me. He then works another circle. When catches a scent that is when he will slowly quarter to pin down where it is coming from exactly. One thing I would add I can take Tony out of his circle with hand signels or by changing direction. He will quarter for a bit when I change direction.....Bob

    My Dog And I Are A Team. We Practice Every Day. I Always Trust Tony, He Knows More Than I do.
    HillbillyUser is Offline Master Hunter Master Hunter Send Private Message Posts:706 Hillbilly
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    12 Aug 2009 09:31 PM
    Here's how I do it Porks way works great . But I use a big open field no check cord or lead just the e-collar and whistle (if using the e-collar make sure dog is collar conditioned to here with the collar). When I start walking I go about 100 feet then start zig zagging covering the hole field when I change direction I whistle the dog and point my arm the direction I'm going once I go a little ways I change direction using the same technique. A big creek bottom with a brush line on both sides works great. I mostly train this while hunting or just training. Once dogs start finding birds they'll do their own quartering or like Pork said their own style of quartering.
    Life's Short Play Hard
    BobUser is Offline Master Hunter Master Hunter Send Private Message Posts:550 Bob
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    12 Aug 2009 09:36 PM
    Hillbilly that is the way I taught Tony also. That is why he quarters when I change direction......Bob
    My Dog And I Are A Team. We Practice Every Day. I Always Trust Tony, He Knows More Than I do.
    HillbillyUser is Offline Master Hunter Master Hunter Send Private Message Posts:706 Hillbilly
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    12 Aug 2009 09:48 PM
    It's simple and you can throw it in while training other stuff or hunting.
    Life's Short Play Hard
    BobUser is Offline Master Hunter Master Hunter Send Private Message Posts:550 Bob
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    12 Aug 2009 11:46 PM
    Funny thing, The field I trained him in, is weeds. But has a tire track road down the middle of it. I would take him to one side of the road and then the other in the quartering training. We still use the same field for our Daily Run. Now 9 years later, when gets to that field. I walk down the road. He automatically quarters, for about the first 2/3 of the field. That is, unless he finds a Quail or 2 out there.......Bob
    My Dog And I Are A Team. We Practice Every Day. I Always Trust Tony, He Knows More Than I do.
    zeppelinUser is Offline Pheasant Egg Pheasant Egg Send Private Message Posts:3 zeppelin
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    13 Aug 2009 07:37 AM

    That is great advice and I thank you all for replying. I will ponder a few ideas and come up with a plan.. One thing I have learned is to STICK to a plan or it's gone! I just hope my plan is the right one! ( crossing fingers)

     I will be interested to see how he does on the first year hunt. That will tell all..

     Again, thanks for the input.

    coolcreekretrieversUser is Offline Pheasant Egg Pheasant Egg Send Private Message Posts:35 coolcreekretrievers
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    16 Aug 2009 08:05 AM

    One thing to remember is a young dog needs to find a lot of birds. I have about 20 homing pigeons that I use to train young dogs with. I will go out and plant 20 pigeons in a very small field this way the dog will find them one right after another, as the dog gets the idea of what to do I will use less and less pigeons in the same field. After the dog is quartering in this field fairly well I move to a bigger field  with more cover and repeat what i did in the small field. if you use homing pigeons you can use them over and over again. Because after you flush them they fly right back home. I have been using the same pigeons for the last 5 years.

    www.coolcreekretrievers.com
    dogpowerUser is Offline Pheasant Chick Pheasant Chick Send Private Message Posts:60 dogpower
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    16 Aug 2009 09:28 AM

    I use the same method that Hillbilly does. After the dog is working good with me, I'll have a couple shooters on either side of me walking straight while I zig-zag between them.  I'll let the dog work just beyond each shooter before turning it. We'll work our way toward a pair of birds, one on each side of the shooters. I gradually decrease the amount commands and distance of zig-zagging as the dog begins anticipating the turn at the proper range. If the dog turns at the right time by it's self, don't whistle or stimulate with the collar. It doesn't take long for the dog to learn to work the line with minimal commands.

    I agree with coolcreek about birds. Nothing makes a good bird dog better than birds, birds and more birds. Whether it's pigeons or game birds, get as many as you can afford in front of your dog.

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