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Last Post 20 Aug 2009 09:17 PM by Westfork. 13 Replies.
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BrandonUser is Offline Pheasant Egg Pheasant Egg Send Private Message Posts:3 Brandon
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17 Aug 2009 03:50 PM

    I'm new to dog training.  I just picked up a 13 month old Germ Shorthair who's had no training.  She's house breaking very well with no accidents.  We've had her 3 days and she's getting the hang of SIT and DOWN.  She's learning OFF as well.  My problems are:

    She's constantly putting her paws on the counter (hops down with the off command though)

    She is hard headed and doesn't come when called very well.

    Finally....where do I really start?  I'm trying to bond with her after taking her from her home.  At the same time, I want to train her.  What order to you teach the commands?  Am I going in the right order with SIT, DOWN, and COME being the first? 

    Thanks for all the forthcoming help.

    dogpowerUser is Offline Pheasant Chick Pheasant Chick Send Private Message Posts:60 dogpower
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    17 Aug 2009 05:06 PM

    Learning to train a dog starting with an untrained GSP at that age is kinda like learning to swim by jumping off a ship in the middle of the ocean - tough to do, but if you're successful, you'll be d-mn good at it. 

    The "paws on the counter" is an easy fix.  Put something that will attract your dog on the counter and line the edge of it with mouse traps.  This cures most dogs after one encounter with the traps, some may need a second encounter.  If your dog requires a third encounter, you may be dealing with a knot head and hopefully someone on that ship will toss you a lifeline to help you get out of the ocean.  The nice thing about this method is that the dog associates the discipline as coming from the edge of the counter, not from you.  The counter will always be there, you won't be.

    The first thing you need to do, assuming that you've already read some good dog training books, is the bonding thing.  Get the dog to recognize that you are the boss.  Be firm and consistent with your commands and don't use a command in a situation that you can't be sure will end in success, (i.e. don't call her if she is running loose and is likely to ignore you.  Have her on a long lead or check cord and call her when there is slack on the cord.  If she doesn't come right away, use the cord to bring her to you, then praise her when she gets there).

    You are doing good by working with the "sit" and "come" commands.  You might want to work with "heel" also.  I'm not sure what you meant by "down".  Did you mean "lie down" or "down" as in get down after jumping up on someone?  Anyway, these are the basics that need to be solid before going on to hunting training.

    Enough of my 2 cents worth.  I'm sure you'll get alot more from others here.  Good luck with her.

    BobUser is Offline Master Hunter Master Hunter Send Private Message Posts:550 Bob
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    17 Aug 2009 06:03 PM
    I like to teach "come" first. I hate chasing a dog around to train it. Then comes" heel, whoa sit, down as lie down". The come heel and whoa are all taught at the same time. What I do is take the dog for a walk on a leash. I will tell it "heel", walk a ways and "whoa". I drop the leash and walk in front of it, making it "whoa" while I do so. Then I'll kneel on one knee and tell it "come". I really like "Here" better. The dog then comes to me. I praise it pet it and tell what a good dog it was. Then we do it all over again. Once i get them where they are running off the leash, because they know their commands. I use a e-collar for reinforcement. I should add these commands I teach voice and whistle both. The heel is always voice but come and whoa are taught with the whistle......Bob
    My Dog And I Are A Team. We Practice Every Day. I Always Trust Tony, He Knows More Than I do.
    coolcreekretrieversUser is Offline Pheasant Egg Pheasant Egg Send Private Message Posts:35 coolcreekretrievers
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    17 Aug 2009 08:10 PM

    Not sure were you are from. But do a search for clubs in your area to join or a pro that can help you. a lot of pros will let you come out and train with them if you are willing to help them plant or throw birds. Books and videos are a grate to get you started.

    You will need to teach site, here, heal,stay after you think the dog know them do it again. basic commands are the most impotent commands to drill into a dog they must be solid.

    www.coolcreekretrievers.com
    WestforkUser is Offline Send Private Message Posts:50 Westfork
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    17 Aug 2009 08:32 PM

    With a dog this age getting control is paramount.  As others have said you have to be the boss.  One way to reinforce this is to wrestle with the dog in the yard.  As you are playing start pinning the dog to the ground with your body and then finally restrain her totally.  As she tries to squirm loose growl and hold her tighter until she submits totally.  This has always worked for me.  It may take several sessions but continue to do it and then reinforce from time to time. Once you are the alpha male in the situation the quicker she will start responding to the other training.

    BrandonUser is Offline Pheasant Egg Pheasant Egg Send Private Message Posts:3 Brandon
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    17 Aug 2009 10:17 PM

    Very good information so far.  I appreciate your time and input.  I like the idea of the mouse traps on the counter.  I know I need to do a better job working the sit command and the down (lie) command.   I have a book I need to read a bit more thoroughly.

    I have another question.  I'm sorry if it's listed elsewhere, I'll do some searching on old topics soon.

    She's a chewer...anything she can get a hold of.  Some people say not to give a chew toy to a bird dog.  I can't keep giving her pig ears or she'll have diarrhea and I'll go broke.  Chew toy or no?

    WestforkUser is Offline Send Private Message Posts:50 Westfork
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    18 Aug 2009 06:00 AM

    They are going to chew.  When caught with something they should not have tell them no and give them something they can have.  One thing that works well outside is small blocks of 2x4's.  Part of the problem is boredom is the dog getting the neccessary exercise?

    coolcreekretrieversUser is Offline Pheasant Egg Pheasant Egg Send Private Message Posts:35 coolcreekretrievers
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    18 Aug 2009 10:59 AM
    Posted By Westfork on 17 Aug 2009 08:32 PM

     pinning the dog to the ground with your body and then finally restrain her totally.  As she tries to squirm loose growl and hold her tighter until she submits totally.  This has always worked for me.  It may take several sessions but continue to do it and then reinforce from time to time.



     

    This is a very good training tool. I do this as well with all the dogs that have a mind of there own. Dogs that think I got it, I got it, I don't need your help. I have also used this in the field when training with dogs that just blow you off. Once they realize that no matter were they are I have to listen. You want to get them to a point that they will submit totally, when you have a dog that has submitted totally to you, as you get up the dog will remain laying there on his side. Then you are the boss and training will be a lot easer. You don't need to do this with all dogs just the ones that are head strong. I will take a truck load off this kind of dog anytime.

    www.coolcreekretrievers.com
    BobUser is Offline Master Hunter Master Hunter Send Private Message Posts:550 Bob
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    18 Aug 2009 09:02 PM
    Something that help Tony and his chewing is two fold. I gave him those large white rawhide bones. They are made by Harpers. The second part is teach no and be very stern about it. No means you stop right now. Once they learn "NO" things get simple, at least they did for me........Bob
    My Dog And I Are A Team. We Practice Every Day. I Always Trust Tony, He Knows More Than I do.
    BrandonUser is Offline Pheasant Egg Pheasant Egg Send Private Message Posts:3 Brandon
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    18 Aug 2009 10:18 PM
    I'll have to try the wrestling trick. I finally relented and gave her a Kong to chew. It has cut down on the trying to chew everything in sight behavior. She's good about stopping if you tell her, but she'll be back to it in a few minutes. the kong keeps her busy. Did I mention she looked at our Redbud tree (3" diameter) then turned her head sideways and started gnawing on it.
    llewellinUser is Offline Happy Puppy Happy Puppy Send Private Message Posts:102 llewellin
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    19 Aug 2009 05:40 PM

    bob did you need a soft hand with tony or was he a hard head seems like he was a pretty biddible?? (spelling)

    BobUser is Offline Master Hunter Master Hunter Send Private Message Posts:550 Bob
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    20 Aug 2009 01:21 PM
    Llew, Tony was a dog that was hard headed, as a young dog But you could do more chewing him out that anything else. A Brittany, Tony or any other Britt. you never hit not even a slap on the butt. They forgive but never forget. I tap Tony's nose with 1 finger as I'm chewing on him, or pinch a ear. That sort of stuff but no hitting. Now that you make me think about it. I have not had to do that in a long time. He has mellowed with age........Bob
    My Dog And I Are A Team. We Practice Every Day. I Always Trust Tony, He Knows More Than I do.
    ggburkeUser is Offline Pheasant Egg Pheasant Egg Send Private Message Posts:14 ggburke
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    20 Aug 2009 02:24 PM

    I have a lab. She is kind of sensitive. They say there are three levels of correction to stop a dog from biting or chewing: The first is by holding her mouth shut and saying no bite. The second is to pinch their gums against their teeth and say no bite. The third is to shove your fingers down their throat and say no bite. I only had made it to level two. There are sprays that stop a dog from chewing things... Bitter Apple.

    I never hit my dog either.  I grab her by both sides of the collar and shaker her. It startles her a little and tells her I am bigger and strong then she is, shows her who the alpha is. My dog weighs 80 pound and hitting her does no good. You have to hit them pretty hard to make your point and it is too easy to go too far if they really anger you. Once you cross that line the trust is gone.
     

    WestforkUser is Offline Send Private Message Posts:50 Westfork
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    20 Aug 2009 09:17 PM
    One of the biggest mistakes I made in the past is getting too impatient. Once you have a good dog that performs well you naturally want all your dogs to be that way. We need to "mellow out" and let the dog mature. Don't expect a 1 to 3 year old to be like a dog in the prime. Take it easy and be forgiving.
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